TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
A recent decision issued by United States District Court Judge Robert Scola found that the website of an owner and operator of a chain of regional grocery stores is subject to Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) as a service of a public accommodation, and must be accessible to persons who are visually impaired. Gil v. Winn-Dixie Stores, Inc. appears to be the first trial on the issue of whether a website is covered by Title III of the ADA.
Geotargeting—delivering content to users based on their geographic location—has become a popular and effective marketing tool. Yet proper implementation may be more nuanced than originally contemplated because certain locations, like medical facilities, attract intense privacy fears.
A seismic shift is afoot in the intelligence, complexity, and interconnectedness of everyday products, and the flimsy foundation of customer assent to standard terms will continue to crack, if not collapse.
We get it. You sell widgets. You’ve always sold widgets. Your time-tested terms of sale/purchase have served you faithfully through product, industry, and economic cycles. You don’t sell apps or clouds, so why should this brave new digital world shake up your contracting process?
The Pennsylvania Bar Institute’s (PBI’s) annual Internet Law Update seminar will be held on March 28, 2017. This year’s seminar was planned by Morgan Lewis partner Peter Watt-Morse, and Morgan Lewis associates Eric Pennesi and Ben Klaber will join Peter on the faculty.
In January 2015, we wrote about California’s ban on nondisparagement clauses in consumer contracts under the “Yelp” Bill.
As companies increasingly experience data breaches, we’d like to remind clients of some resources to guide them through their initial response to such a breach.
On October 6, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler released a factsheet outlining proposed rules aimed at protecting broadband consumers’ privacy, which would apply to internet service providers (ISPs) and cover data collection, usage, security, and breach notification.
As of September 30, Russian state authorities now reject tender submissions for supply of certain foreign electronic equipment if there are two concurrent submissions for supply of locally produced equipment. The ban applies to 113 types of equipment, including personal computers, printers, memory cards, mobile and landline phones, TV sets, cameras, microphones, and cash and ATM machines.
As part of our Sourcing and Technology Lunchtime Series, partners Michael Pillion and Peter Watt-Morse recently spoke during their webinar “The Next Frontier: How Robots and Automation are Changing Outsourcing and Technology Agreements.”