TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
In this two-part edition of our Spotlight series, we welcome Lee Harding to discuss key labor and employment law issues in relation to outsourcing transactions, predominantly in the United Kingdom and European Union.
When two parties come together to discuss a new idea or potential collaboration, the parties are usually operating under the protection of a non-disclosure agreement (NDA). If the parties decide to work together, they will most likely enter into a services agreement outlining their respective rights and obligations, including intellectual property (IP) ownership and commercialization rights. Occasionally, parties operating solely under an NDA may start collaborating in a way that’s not fully covered by the NDA prior to entering into a services agreement because they’re just not at that stage of the relationship yet. Regardless of whether the parties are ready to enter into such an agreement, if there is any potential for IP to be created in connection with such a collaboration (even if it’s fairly informal), the agreement between the parties needs to address the rights of each party with respect to any such IP.
Join partners Mike Pierides, from our London office, and Peter M. Watt-Morse, from our Pittsburgh office, at 12:00 pm ET on Tuesday, May 17 as they share highlights from the top articles posted over the past year on our Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis blog.
Limitation of liability provisions are standard in almost every contract and are essential in helping the contract parties limit their risk. These provisions typically contain a broad disclaimer of consequential damages and a cap on direct damages; however, it is common practice to exclude certain types of damages from such disclaimers and/or caps.
The Stanford Institute for Human Centered Artificial Intelligence recently published its AI Index Report 2022. In a world of near-constant advancement and innovation in technology, it’s no surprise the report found that more global artificial intelligence (AI) legislation was proposed in 2021 than ever before.
Join partners Robert Mailer, Courtney C. Nowell, Andrew M. Ray, and Stephen C. Tirrell at 12:00 pm ET on March 30, 2022 as they delve into notable recent digital asset fund raises, trends in the market, the impacts of the proliferation of digital assets on private fund terms, and the approaches being taken by certain key players.
The White House issued an executive order on March 9 relating to the responsible development of digital assets in the United States. This executive order outlines the first ever whole-of-government approach to both addressing the risks of digital assets and maximizing the potential benefits.
The Bank of England (Bank) and the UK Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) published their final report of discussions from the UK Artificial Intelligence Public-Private Forum on February 17. Over quarterly meetings and several workshops conducted since October 2020, the Bank and the FCA jointly facilitated dialogue between the public sector, the private sector, and academia in order to deepen their collective understanding of artificial intelligence (AI) and explore how to support the safe adoption of AI. This initiative was incorporated into the UK National AI Strategy.
In this edition of our Spotlight series, we welcome David Plotinsky to discuss key issues that technology lawyers and professionals should keep in mind regarding tech transactions, foreign investment, and review by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS).
The Morgan Lewis M&A Academy continues on February 22 with the next presentation in “Track 2 | Getting the Deal Done – Specialists Matter” regarding key issues and considerations when companies are buying or selling technology assets. As technology and sourcing professionals, it is important to stay up to date on M&A market trends and deal issues relating to technology transfers.