TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on March 9 proposed new rules to enhance and standardize disclosures relating to the risk management, strategy, governance, and incident reporting requirements of cybersecurity applicable to public companies (registrants).

Join partners Mark L. Krotoski, Charles M. Horn and associate Martin Hirschprung at 1:00 pm ET on March 15, 2022 as they provide a summary of the existing and developing requirements faced by “banking organizations” following the publication of a final rule to notify their primary federal regulator within 36 hours in the event of certain kinds of computer-security-related incidents.

The unfolding conflict in Eastern Europe is likely going to cause a wide-ranging impact to companies with business operations or personnel in the region. For technology and commercial contracting professionals, this means potential contract disputes, force majeure issues, business continuity implications, and cybersecurity concerns.
In this edition of our Spotlight series, we welcome David Plotinsky to discuss key issues that technology lawyers and professionals should keep in mind regarding tech transactions, foreign investment, and review by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS).
We have heard time and time again that we should not reuse passwords across accounts—if a cybercriminal were to obtain access to the password of one account, they could then use such password to access multiple accounts. This use of stolen passwords and other credentials has led to a rise in credential stuffing attacks. A new guide released this month by New York Attorney General Letitia James investigates the rise in credential stuffing attacks and best practices designed to prevent such attacks.

As we start 2022, as part of our Spotlight series, we connect with Reece Hirsch, the co-head of Morgan Lewis’s privacy and cybersecurity practice, to discuss the recent policy statement issued by the US Federal Trade Commission regarding the Health Breach Notification Rule and how it applies to health app developers that handle consumers’ sensitive health information. Our Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis blog also published a summary of the policy statement.

As 2021 comes to a close, we have once again compiled all the links to our Contract Corner blog posts, a regular feature of Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis. In these posts, members of our global technology, outsourcing, and commercial transactions practice highlight particular contract provisions, review the issues, and propose negotiating and drafting tips.
Broad awareness has been made about cyberattacks in the form of phishing that typically use email messages to lure victims into divulging sensitive information or opening a link that allows malware to infiltrate their device. Companies have learned how to combat phishing by training employees to recognize such scam attempts and report them as phishing to protect their organizations. “Vishing” is another tactic used by scammers that, while less familiar, is no less invasive and dangerous.
With the exponential growth of cyber threats, cloud computing and remote working, contract provisions regarding data security requirements have also expanded in size and frequency. It has become common practice to prepare schedules to detail (and limit) security requirements. Customers and vendors both have a vested interest in clearly identifying expectations and obligations for such requirements. In this week’s Contract Corner, we explore considerations when it comes to drafting security schedules.
According to recent guidance from the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC), providers of health apps and connected devices that collect consumers’ health information must comply with the FTC’s Health Breach Notification Rule, 16 CFR Part 318, and therefore are required to notify consumers and others when their health data is breached.