YOUR GO-TO SOURCE FOR ANALYSIS OF ISSUES AFFECTING THE PHARMA & BIOTECH SECTORS

Over the last few months, FDA has continued its efforts to encourage and facilitate the use of the agency’s Expanded Access Program (EAP). This follows other FDA EAP actions, including its announcement of program improvements. Overall, these steps appear to signal that FDA is trying to position the EAP as a desirable option for patients, healthcare providers, and industry following the passage of the Federal Right to Try statute, in which, as noted in FDA’s recent Right to Try Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), the agency plays a very limited role.

Human cell and gene therapy research has advanced dramatically in recent years and opened the door to potential treatments for diseases once considered incurable. On January 15, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D., and Peter Marks, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), issued a joint statement announcing plans to keep pace with the rapidly growing and evolving field through new policy guidance and other assistance. According to the statement, FDA is turning its attention and additional resources toward these therapies in 2019 due to a “large upswing” in the number of cell and gene therapy investigational new drug (IND) applications. Based on an assessment of the more than 800 cell-based and gene therapy INDs current on file with the agency, FDA projects that it will receive more than 200 cell and gene therapy INDs per year by 2020, and will approve 10 to 20 such products per year by 2025.

To accommodate the uptick and to ensure regulation of firms that may be operating outside of regulatory compliance, the statement sets forth FDA’s planned actions to support cell and gene therapy product development in 2019:

After several delays, the revised US Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (also known as the Common Rule) went into effect on January 21. The Common Rule is generally applicable to research conducted or supported by one of the federal departments or agencies that has integrated the rule into its own regulations (e.g., US Department of Health and Human Services (including the National Institutes of Health), US Department of Agriculture, US Department of Defense). Some clinical trial sites may also apply the Common Rule across all clinical research projects, regardless of funding source, through a US Office for Human Research Protections Federal Wide Assurance.

Despite the mandate under the 21st Century Cures Act to harmonize FDA regulations with the Common Rule to the extent practicable and allowable under existing legislative provisions, FDA has yet to propose aligning regulations. Rather, FDA issued guidance titled Impact of Certain Provisions of the Revised Common Rule on FDA-Regulated Clinical Investigations. As of right now, while FDA is aware of new inconsistencies between its human subject regulations and the revised Common Rule, the agency has advised that when a given study is subject to both sets of regulations, the rule that offers greater human subject protection should be applied. The guidance sets forth FDA’s position on the following areas of potential discrepancies between the Common Rule and FDA regulations:

FDA recently signaled that it plans to be more involved in facilitating expanded access to investigational new drugs. This follows the agency’s announcement of its efforts to improve and clarify the expanded access program (EAP), as well as state and federal legislation intended to simplify the process to use investigational drugs for treatment purposes.

One item that stakeholders may have missed, given the almost daily FDA developments, was the agency’s announcement that it will continue to improve and clarify its expanded access program (EAP). Specifically, FDA

  • updated its EAP webpage to streamline content and make the page more user friendly;
  • established an agency-wide Patient Affairs Staff and Health Care Provider Affairs Program to increase FDA engagement with stakeholder groups;
  • established an agency-wide Expanded Access Coordinating Committee to facilitate cross-center communications and discussion of cross-cutting issues; and
  • established a work group for the implementation of the Federal Right to Try law.

These follow a May 2018 independent assessment commissioned by the agency, which found that while stakeholders reported positive overall perceptions of the EAP and FDA’s role, there continue to be “pain points.” For instance, there continues to be confusion regarding program navigation, difficulties with multi-stakeholder coordination, and administrative burden.

Update: FDA has now extended the comment period for this proposed rule to February 13, 2019.

FDA recently announced a proposal to add an exception to the agency’s informed consent requirements. Under the proposed rule, FDA will allow Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) to waive or alter informed consent for clinical trials that present only minimal risk to the subjects. This proposal is similar to the policy set forth in FDA’s guidance document on the same topic, which we have written on previously.

The Trickett Wendler, Frank Mongiello, Jordan McLinn, and Matthew Bellina Right to Try Act of 2017 (Federal Right to Try Act), signed into law on May 30, creates a federal framework for patients to access investigational new drugs without enrolling in clinical trials and without FDA expanded access approval. The law, however, leaves a number of unanswered questions that industry, healthcare providers, and patients must currently navigate without the benefit of regulatory guidance. For example, exactly how the Federal Right to Try Act interacts with state right to try legislation and FDA’s existing expanded access program is currently unclear. Implementation of the Federal Right to Try Act will be a developing area that stakeholders should continue to monitor. Moreover, stakeholders considering providing investigational drug access outside of clinical trials will have a number of areas to think about when determining which pathway to use.

Read the full LawFlash.

As precision medicine gains momentum and in vitro diagnostics (IVDs) become increasingly used in clinical trials, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies must quickly become familiar with the FDA’s investigational device framework. Based on concerns that drug clinical trial sponsors do not appreciate the need to follow device regulations when using “investigational” IVDs in clinical trials, in its draft guidance, FDA provides more structure around the incorporation of IVDs into clinical trials, and sets out its expectations about sponsors’ scope of review of the risk of use of such IVDs. The draft guidance will need to be factored into how pharmaceutical and biotechnology clinical trial sponsors use IVDs in clinical trials and work with device partners.

Read the full LawFlash.