YOUR GO-TO SOURCE FOR ANALYSIS OF ISSUES AFFECTING THE PHARMA & BIOTECH SECTORS

The FDA announced on March 18 that it is suspending onsite routine domestic inspections in an effort to slow the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19) and help flatten the pandemic curve. This announcement follows a March 10 guidance that routine foreign inspections were suspended. For-cause inspections will proceed if deemed “mission-critical.” Dennis Gucciardo, Michele Buenafe, and Jaqueline Berman address the tools that FDA will use to oversee the safety and quality of FDA-regulated products during this emergency in their recently authored LawFlash.

Read the full LawFlash.

The FDA issued guidance on March 20 for the manufacture of hand sanitizers by companies not previously registered to make OTC drugs. The guidance comes in response to hand sanitizer shortages during the coronavirus (COVID-19) emergency, particularly among employers in the healthcare and essential services sectors where employees are still present or interacting with consumers. Morgan Lewis lawyers Kathleen Sanzo and Jacqueline Berman authored a lawflash detailing issues for manufacturers and purchasers under the new policy.

Read the full LawFlash

With the increasing numbers of coronavirus (COVID-19) cases and the declaration of a global pandemic by the World Health Organization, the pharmaceutical and biotech industries are assessing how this situation may impact business operations.

Some areas that companies should consider include the following:

  • Supply chain disruption, including active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and excipient shortages
  • Drug shortages and related FDA notices
  • FDA inspection priority shifts
  • Potential impacts on import surveillance
  • Delays in FDA’s review of pending drug applications
  • Possible impacts on clinical trials and necessary changes to relevant trial documents
  • The impact on drug promotion and new risks created by the changing landscape

For further analysis, please see our March 13 LawFlash, Potential Impact of Coronavirus (COVID-19) on the Pharmaceutical and Biotech Industries.

Now is the time for pharmaceutical manufacturers to review their Open Payments/Sunshine Act internal compliance procedures, data collection forms and databases, and reporting and recordkeeping templates for payments and transfers of value made to healthcare providers. On August 14, 2019, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) published a Proposed Rule seeking to expand the Open Payments program, including the number and types of covered recipients and payment categories. As a result, drug manufacturers have at least two reasons to quickly conduct a comprehensive internal examination of their Open Payments program.

President Donald Trump announced that, as of September 24, 2018, additional tariffs of 10% were imposed on hundreds of chemical ingredients, many of which are used in the manufacturing of dietary supplements, cosmetics, and over-the-counter (OTC) drug products. Manufacturers have had to develop contingency plans and strategies for dealing with the imposition of these tariffs. Such contingency plans may include renegotiating supplier contracts; re-sourcing the ingredients; and notifying distributors and customers of disruptions, delays, or price changes. A rise in the tariff rate to 25% for these products, scheduled for January 1, 2019, has been delayed pending current negotiations with China, and during this period no exclusion requests on particular products are being accepted by the Office of the US Trade Representative.

Read the full LawFlash.