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YOUR SOURCE ON FOOD LITIGATION AND REGULATION
On August 17, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a Final Rule on the Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) notification program, a voluntary premarket notification program for products used in food substances.
Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced its plan to redefine the implied nutrient content claim “healthy” by issuing a new guidance document — Use of the Term “Healthy” in the Labeling of Human Food Products 1 (Guidance).
On September 19, the FDA Foods and Veterinary Programs held a webinar to discuss FDA’s recent issuance of the preventive controls hazard analysis and risk-based draft guidance (Draft Guidance), which became available for public comment on August 24, 2016.
FDA recently released an updated version of its draft guidance on new dietary ingredients (NDIs), Dietary Supplements: New Dietary Ingredient Notifications and Related Issues.
On August 24, the FDA issued a final rule that extends and clarifies the compliance dates for a limited subset of Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) requirements in four of the seven foundational rules part of FDA’s FSMA implementation.
On July 14, FDA issued a final rule amending the requirements for the registration of food facilities (Final Rule).
On June 1, FDA issued draft guidance for voluntary sodium reduction goals for food manufacturers and restaurants.
On May 27, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) published a final rule on Mitigation Strategies to Protect Food Against Intentional Adulteration (Final Rule).
On May 13, FDA announced the publication of a draft guidance to assist “qualified facilities” (i.e., very small or low-grossing businesses) in complying with the Preventive Controls for Human or Animal Food Rules (PC Final Rules) under the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) (Draft Guidance).
On May 10, FDA announced that it will reevaluate regulations concerning nutrient content claims (NCCs), including the definition of “healthy.” An NCC is a claim on a food product label that directly or by implication characterizes the level of a nutrient in a food (e.g., “low fat,” “high in fiber,” “healthy”).