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YOUR SOURCE ON FOOD LITIGATION AND REGULATION
On July 14, FDA issued a final rule amending the requirements for the registration of food facilities (Final Rule).
On June 1, FDA issued draft guidance for voluntary sodium reduction goals for food manufacturers and restaurants.
On May 27, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) published a final rule on Mitigation Strategies to Protect Food Against Intentional Adulteration (Final Rule).
On May 13, FDA announced the publication of a draft guidance to assist “qualified facilities” (i.e., very small or low-grossing businesses) in complying with the Preventive Controls for Human or Animal Food Rules (PC Final Rules) under the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) (Draft Guidance).
On May 10, FDA announced that it will reevaluate regulations concerning nutrient content claims (NCCs), including the definition of “healthy.” An NCC is a claim on a food product label that directly or by implication characterizes the level of a nutrient in a food (e.g., “low fat,” “high in fiber,” “healthy”).
If you have been down a pet food aisle recently, you may have noticed dog and cat foods that claim to treat various conditions, making claims to treat urinary tract disease in cats or “control blood glucose” in dogs.
On January 4, 2011, US President Barack Obama signed the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) . [1] The law’s aim is to shift the focus on food safety from responding to problems to preventing them.
In a decision that will impact numerous lawsuits in the lower courts, in Kane v. Chobani (No. 14-15670 (9th Cir. Mar. 24, 2016)) the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit stayed proceedings in a class action regarding the alleged misuse of the term “natural” on food labels until the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has completed its review of the term.
The FDA issued a statement on March 9 indicating that, as a result of language in the Omnibus Appropriations Bill enacted December 18, 2015, 1 it is delaying enforcement of the Nutrition Labeling of Standard Menu Items in Restaurants and Similar Retail Food Establishments Final Rule (Menu Labeling Final Rule).
On March 7, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the availability of revised guidance for industry titled “ A Dietary Supplement Labeling Guide: Chapter II. Identity Statement ” (Revised Guidance).