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YOUR SOURCE ON FOOD LITIGATION AND REGULATION
On December 1, the US Department of Agriculture's (USDA’s) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) issued a proposed rule to amend the nutrition labeling regulations for meat and poultry products (Proposed Rule). The revisions in the Proposed Rule are meant to parallel, to the extent possible, the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) two similar final rules concerning nutrition fact labels (Nutrition Labeling Rules).
On November 2, the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS or the Agency) released its Fiscal Year (FY) 2017–2021 Strategic Plan, which provides a framework for FSIS to address continual challenges with inspection modernization and articulates FSIS’s goals for meeting its public health mission over the next four years.
On October 5, the US Department of Agriculture’s FSIS released an updated version of its Labeling Guideline on Documentation Needed to Substantiate Animal Raising Claims for Label Submission.
Adopting a practice with the potential for considerable long-term significance, USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) recently announced that it will soon begin sharing more food safety data regarding slaughter and processing facilities.
In late October, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), along with state and local officials investigated an outbreak of E. coli infections linked to food served at a major fast-casual restaurant chain.
Reuters reports that California is considering adding processed meats (such as hot dogs, ham, and sausages) to its list of cancer-causing products.
On June 10, the Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS), which administers the Shell Egg Surveillance Program (a mandatory inspection program for shell egs), published a proposed rule that would streamline the importation of table eggs, hatching eggs, and inedible liquid eggs.
Earlier this month, the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California agreed with a group of foie gras producers that California’s ban on the product’s sale was preempted by federal law, and the court overturned the ban that has been in place since July 1, 2012.
On New Year’s Eve, the USDA’s (Department’s) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) released its final rule requiring meat and poultry processors to include added solutions in their product labeling.
The growing trend of retroactive recalls for already distributed food products calls into question commonly held beliefs about food safety.