YOUR GO-TO SOURCE FOR ANALYSIS OF ISSUES AFFECTING THE PHARMA & BIOTECH SECTORS

A handful of bills that comprised a healthcare reform package championed by Florida House Republicans are on their way to the governor’s desk where they’ll likely be signed into law. The result of an ambitious effort by lawmakers to overhaul how Florida regulates healthcare, the bills represent a striking departure from the current regulatory environment. Passed during the last week of the legislative session with a July 1, 2019, general effective date, providers will want to begin reviewing their policies in anticipation of the coming change.

The New York State Drug Take Back Act (Act), which was signed into law on July 10, 2018, went into effect on January 6, 2019. However, due to statutory timelines, enforcement actions are unlikely to start until after October 2019. Nonetheless, drug manufacturers should continue to diligently work toward the various Act deadlines, as development of a drug take-back program will require an investment of manufacturer time and money.

Although federal efforts on drug pricing remain at the proposal stage, recently enacted legislation in six states on drug price transparency requires pharmaceutical manufacturers to review and update their approaches to prescription drug pricing and price increases on an ongoing basis to ensure compliance with state laws. Beginning in 2019, some states will impose penalties for noncompliance with reporting obligations. The state statutes raise various concerns, including that they vary from state to state, are often unclear as to what products are covered, and use different calculation methods and evidence to support price increases.

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The Trickett Wendler, Frank Mongiello, Jordan McLinn, and Matthew Bellina Right to Try Act of 2017 (Federal Right to Try Act), signed into law on May 30, creates a federal framework for patients to access investigational new drugs without enrolling in clinical trials and without FDA expanded access approval. The law, however, leaves a number of unanswered questions that industry, healthcare providers, and patients must currently navigate without the benefit of regulatory guidance. For example, exactly how the Federal Right to Try Act interacts with state right to try legislation and FDA’s existing expanded access program is currently unclear. Implementation of the Federal Right to Try Act will be a developing area that stakeholders should continue to monitor. Moreover, stakeholders considering providing investigational drug access outside of clinical trials will have a number of areas to think about when determining which pathway to use.

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