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After a relatively quiet May on the financial regulatory front, an item from an atypical source caught our attention.
In a concise panel ruling (CFPB vs. Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools) that no doubt stings for the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit has held that the CFPB failed to provide adequate notice of the purpose of a civil investigative demand (CID) it issued to an accrediting group for for-profit colleges, and has accordingly declined to enforce the CID.
Determined to push forward with its Dodd-Frank Act reform legislation agenda, on April 11 the US House Financial Services Committee (Committee) released a summary of changes that it intends to make to the Financial CHOICE Act (CHOICE Act)—Dodd-Frank Act reform legislation that was introduced in the House of Representatives last fall but was not enacted before the end of the 114th Congress.
US President Donald Trump issued an executive order (EO) on February 3 that directs the secretary of the US Department of the Treasury and the heads of the major federal financial regulatory agencies to review “existing laws, treaties, regulations, guidance, reporting and recordkeeping requirements, and other government policies” for their consistency with a series of newly created “Core Principles” for the oversight and regulation of the financial sector, and to report back with their findings within 120 days.
In a post-inauguration interview with The Wall Street Journal, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Richard Cordray forcefully asserted his and his agency’s independence from the incoming administration of President Donald Trump.