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Notwithstanding objections from both parties of the US Congress and state banking regulators, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) is moving forward with its proposal to accept applications from financial technology companies for a special purpose national bank charter (FinTech Charter) and has issued draft guidelines (FinTech Charter Guide) for its evaluation of FinTech Charter applications.
In its decision, the Second Circuit remanded the case to the US District Court for the Southern District of New York for the resolution of remaining state law questions, including whether Delaware law (which has no usury limitations) governed the account agreement.
As we previously reported, a three-judge panel of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit held in October 2016 that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) was unconstitutionally structured in that too much authority is concentrated in its unitary director.
The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency’s (OCC’s) recent announcement that it will receive and process applications for financial technology (fintech) charters is attracting negative attention from diverse sectors of the public arena.
As the incoming administration of President-elect Donald J. Trump prepares to roll back federal regulations impacting a wide variety of industries, the battleground will not just be in Washington, DC—it may emerge in the states.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has filed a petition for rehearing en banc asking the full US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit to overturn a court panel’s decision in the much-watched PHH Corporation v. CFPB.
The election of Donald J. Trump as president and continued Republican control of both the US Senate and House of Representatives may provide the new president the opportunity to immediately remake the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) after he takes office in January 2017.
The federal bank and credit union regulatory agencies (including the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB)), acting through the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC), have substantially revised the Uniform Interagency Consumer Compliance Rating System (Rating System).
As National Cybersecurity Awareness Month comes to a close, the federal financial regulators have been releasing guidance related to cybersecurity and financial technology (FinTech) issues faster than a teen can complain about slow Wi-Fi.
In the closely watched case PHH Corporation v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a panel of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has held that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB’s) structure is unconstitutional but that the constitutional flaw is remedied simply by striking the CFPB provision that authorizes the statute restricting the US president’s power to remove its director except “for cause.”