Choose Site
On October 7, attorneys general (all Democrats) from New York, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Vermont filed a comment letter (Comment Letter) with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) supporting proposed rules concerning Payday, Vehicle Title, and Certain High-Cost Installment Loans (Proposed Rule), to be codified at 12 C.F.R. §1041.
On October 5, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) released its final rule (Final Rule) extending an array of new substantive restrictions, upfront and ongoing disclosure obligations, and government reporting requirements on prepaid cards and a range of electronic non-bank accounts, commonly referred to as “digital wallets.”
In a significant decision , on August 31, the US District Court for the Central District of California held that a tribal bank originating loans for a non-bank lender was not the “true lender”—making the loans subject to state usury limits.
On August 1, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) published a Notice in the Federal Register seeking comment on a proposal to expand the information it gathers for its consumer complaint database to include complaint disposition information from consumers.
On July 28, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) released a detailed summary of regulations it is considering imposing on third-party debt collectors.
On July 6, North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory signed into law legislation to bring certain virtual currency businesses expressly within the existing money transfer business regulatory scheme by repealing and replacing the current law with a new article.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) today proposed rules ( Payday, Vehicle Title, and Certain High-Cost Installment Loans ) pursuant to its authority under 12 U.S.C.
On May 5, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) released its long-awaited proposed rule (Proposed Rule) on the use of arbitration clauses by consumer financial services companies in their customer contracts that restrict a customer’s ability to file or join a class action lawsuit.
In a clear and concise decision, the US District Court for the District of Columbia has ruled that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) lacked the statutory authority to issue a Civil Investigative Demand (CID) to the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools (ACICS), an accreditor of for-profit colleges.
In a spirited oral argument on April 12, a panel of the US Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit questioned the constitutionality of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB’s) governance structure.