Choose Site
Kathleen Kraninger, only the second Senate-confirmed director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) in its almost eight-year existence, recently gave her first public remarks.
Recent action by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) may bring some relief to fintech developers and the broader financial services industry as new products run into otherwise insurmountable regulatory hurdles that do not take into account or adapt to new technologies.
The Joint Committee of the European Supervisory Authorities (the ESAs) issued a report on 7 January 2019 on the status of regulatory sandboxes and innovation hubs following consultations with national regulators across the European Union.
The US Senate has confirmed Kathy Kraninger to serve as the second director of the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (BCFP). She will serve a five-year term ending in December 2023, unless she is terminated for cause by the president.
The ongoing and accelerating pace of developments in the realm of cryptoassets in multiple jurisdictions warrants continual review and monitoring.
After lengthy litigation on which we have commented extensively (see here and here), the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit issued an en banc opinion vacating and reversing in part a decision of a panel of that court, and holding that the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau, and formerly the CFPB), was not unconstitutionally structured.
The UK Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) issued a press release on August 7 announcing that it has joined 11 other financial regulators from around the world to create the Global Financial Innovation Network (GFIN), building on its proposals earlier in the year to create a “global sandbox.”
On July 6, the Federal Reserve Board, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (together, the Agencies) issued an interagency statement (Statement) regarding the impact of the recently enacted Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act (the tongue-tying EGRRCPA), which we previously summarized.
In yet another example of state attorneys general stepping up their activities in response to a perceived regulatory rollback in Washington, 16 attorneys general , all Democrats, have written to the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection (Bureau), formerly the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), proposing in quite strident terms that the Bureau not reduce its authority for or use of key enforcement tools such as the Civil Investigative Demand (CID).
At a recent meeting of state attorneys general, Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Acting Director Mick Mulvaney reiterated his message, previously reported here that his bureau will no longer “push the envelope” on enforcement matters.