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US financial reform at the congressional and regulatory agency levels continues to move along—albeit more in fits and starts than in a blaze of big happenings. Below is a recap on where matters currently stand.
The US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, sitting en banc, held on Wednesday that the unitary and insulated directorship of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is constitutional.
In an op-ed published in Tuesday’s Wall Street Journal publicly reprising an email he sent yesterday to the staff of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), Acting Director Mick Mulvaney set a clear new course, tone, and direction for the bureau.

A recently published opinion of the US District Court for the District of Columbia creates some uncertainty as to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB’s) authority to protect information provided to it pursuant to a civil investigative demand (CID).

The rise of cryptocurrencies and initial coin offerings (ICOs) undoubtedly shows that we live in interesting times that regularly present us with new and innovative products, markets, and opportunities. When the words “new” and “innovative” come to mind, the federal government is usually not part of the conversation.
The Great Schism at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) is over, at least for now, and White House Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney is now firmly in control of the agency as its acting director, having been appointed pursuant to the president’s authority under the Federal Vacancies Reform Act.
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Richard Cordray announced on Wednesday that he will resign from his post on November 30, seven months before the end of his five-year term. This development already is fueling substantial speculation about what is next for the agency.
Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Richard Cordray has announced that he will resign as director effective November 30, some seven months shy of the end of his five-year term.
On August 17, 2017, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and 12 state attorneys general (the Government) filed proposed settlements with Aequitas Capital Management, a now-defunct private equity firm, in connection with loans that Aequitas funded for students of another bankrupt entity, Corinthian Colleges, Inc.
Acting Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chairman Maureen Ohlhausen has released a list of changes to how the agency’s Bureau of Consumer Protection (BCP) will issue civil investigative demands (CIDs)—the principal consumer protection investigative tool the agency wields.