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The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) has released FAQs to supplement its 2013 guidance on risk management of third-party relationships. The FAQs specifically address bank relationships with fintech companies and marketplace lenders, relationships that were not necessarily an OCC focus when the 2013 guidance was issued.
Notwithstanding objections from both parties of the US Congress and state banking regulators, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) is moving forward with its proposal to accept applications from financial technology companies for a special purpose national bank charter (FinTech Charter) and has issued draft guidelines (FinTech Charter Guide) for its evaluation of FinTech Charter applications.
In its decision, the Second Circuit remanded the case to the US District Court for the Southern District of New York for the resolution of remaining state law questions, including whether Delaware law (which has no usury limitations) governed the account agreement.
In a significant decision , on August 31, the US District Court for the Central District of California held that a tribal bank originating loans for a non-bank lender was not the “true lender”—making the loans subject to state usury limits.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has taken two notable steps that signal a new interest in regulating marketplace, or “peer-to-peer,” lending.
A recent decision from the US District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, Kane v. Think Finance, Inc, Civ. No. 14-cv-7139, 2016 WL 183289 (E.D. Pa. 2016), has received a good deal of attention.
In the spirit of the new year, we decided to take our Ouija board out of the attic and venture a few predictions for 2016 in financial services regulation.
The California Department of Business Oversight (DBO) has launched an inquiry into the increasingly popular marketplace lending industry.