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Legal Insights and Perspectives for the Healthcare Industry

The Federal Bar Association's Qui Tam Section held a terrific two-day conference in Washington, DC, on February 28 and March 1, attended by over 200 False Claims Act (FCA) practitioners presenting government, defense, and relator perspectives on current FCA practice. Shout-out to our litigation partners Wendy West Feinstein and Rebecca Hillyer who participated on a panel discussing the FCA and opioids and other pharmaceutical products, and our colleagues Katie McDermott and Jonelle Saunders who attended the program.

There is an important pleading standard question being posed to the US Supreme Court in the petition for writ of certiorari by Intermountain Healthcare (IHC) in a False Claims Act (FCA) case filed by a whistleblower in 2012. The issue involves the pleading requirements under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 9(b), which requires a plaintiff to plead fraud with particularity.

Does a relator have a shorter statute of limitations period than the United States to pursue a False Claims Act (FCA) case when the United States has declined to intervene? A split among the circuit courts has created an opportunity for the US Supreme Court to resolve this vexing question and potentially confirm whether relators are government officials under the statute. In issuing certiorari to the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit, in Cochise Consultancy Inc. v. United States, ex rel. Hunt, the Court will address the limitations issue against the backdrop of a growing litigation trend in declined qui tams and lengthy seal durations when sued defendants have no idea they’ve been sued for many years. Partner Kathleen McDermott breaks down the Cochise appeal—characterized in a recent Morgan Lewis LawFlash as “a hot case to watch”—and offers a timely analysis of the case, and the potential legal consequences of a decision by the US Supreme Court to level set the FCA statute of limitations provisions.

Read the Full Law Flash

The HHS OIG recently published a new Fraud Risk Indicator for False Claims Act (FCA) settlements on the risk spectrum for the first quarter of federal fiscal year 2019. Characterized as “an assessment of future risk posed by persons who have allegedly engaged in civil healthcare fraud,” the Fraud Risk Indicator purports to increase transparency by making public where an FCA defendant falls into one of five color-coded categories on a risk spectrum: Highest Risk – Exclusion (red), High Risk – Heighted Scrutiny (orange), Medium Risk – CIAs (yellow), Lower Risk – No Further Action (green); Low Risk – Self-Disclosure (blue).