Choose Site
Legal Insights and Perspectives for the Healthcare Industry

In a recent LawFlash, our colleagues in the white collar practice discuss the potential for higher education institutions to face criminal and civil liability if they are not in compliance with federal law in the administration of federal grants and expenditure of federal research dollars, as recent cases tied to simultaneous research in China show.

The team highlights that in light of the vital importance of scientific research in combatting the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, and continued strain on aspects of the US–China relationship, the higher education community can expect to see sustained focus by US law enforcement on these matters.

Read the full LawFlash.

We invite you to join our international trade and national security practice on Thursday, May 7, for a webinar on Foreign Influence and Conflicts of Interest in US Universities and Nonprofits Receiving Federal Funds. US universities, nonprofits, and faculty that receive federal funding and grants are required by a number of laws and regulations to disclose foreign gifts and contracts to the federal government. These laws and regulations are based on the understanding that when research institutions fail to meet disclosure requirements, they can compromise the integrity of taxpayer-funded research and allow federal funds to accelerate foreign research and development, sometimes to the detriment of national security interests.

The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) recently announced more than $1.8 billion in funding to support the prevention and treatment of opioid addiction. This latest round of funding, authorized in conjunction with the continuing implementation of the 2018 SUPPORT Act, will be awarded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to states and local communities.

The CDC will provide more than $900 million to help state and local governments track overdose data “as closely to real-time as possible.” Packaged as a three-year cooperative agreement “to scale-up prevention and response activities,” the CDC will distribute $301 million in funding for the first year to states, localities, and some territories beginning in September 2019.