Legal Insights and Perspectives for the Healthcare Industry

CMS has released a pair of rules “that take historic steps to increase price transparency to empower patients and increase competition among all hospitals, group health plans and health insurance issuers in the individual and group markets.” To that end, health plans would be required to disclose their negotiated rates for in-network providers and allowed amounts paid for out-of-network providers on a public website, according to the proposed rule. CMS also finalized its proposed hospital price transparency program released as part of the CY 2020 proposed outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) rule last August.

Morgan Lewis is reviewing these rules more fully and will provide additional analyses on the proposed health plan rule and the final hospital transparency rule in the coming days.

We address more than a dozen key proposals from the CMS outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and ambulatory surgical center payment systems proposed rule in a recent LawFlash. Chief among them is the agency’s bold new proposal for a broad price transparency program. Other notable proposals include continuing payment reductions for 340B drugs and grandfathered off-campus provider-based departments, both the subject of pending litigation in federal court. CMS is soliciting public input on a multitude of proposals from this rule, and comments are due September 27, 2019. Hospitals will want to carefully assess these changes and consider submitting comments before these proposals become final rules.

Read the full LawFlash > >

“Medicare for All” has appeared in the nation’s political dialogue as we head into the next election cycle, with a number of plans being proposed by Democratic lawmakers. Recent public opinion polls show a growing surge in popularity for expanding the federal program that currently insures older Americans. Yet the polls also show a decline in favorability for Medicare for All when respondents are asked about the details of the plans. While there appears to be general agreement that Americans should have access to affordable coverage, the Democratic plans differ over options for reforming the health insurance system. To that end, the Medicare for All plans can be divided into one of two categories: a single payor or a public option plan. From there, the proposals diverge over a mix of fault lines, tradeoffs, and potential for disruption.