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YOUR GO-TO SOURCE FOR ANALYSIS OF ISSUES AFFECTING THE PHARMA & BIOTECH SECTORS
As part of the US Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) overall reorganization of the Office of New Drugs, the former Office of Hematology and Oncology Products (OHOP), the FDA office responsible for approving cancer therapies, was recently restructured and renamed the Office of Oncologic Diseases (OOD).
US President Donald Trump signed a pair of appropriations bills into law on December 20, including bipartisan legislation intended to facilitate the development of generic and biosimilar products.
FDA on September 23 issued a Drug Supply Chain Security Act (DSCSA)–related compliance policy stating it will not take enforcement action against wholesalers that do not have systems in place to verify product identifiers of saleable returned product prior to further distribution until November 27, 2020.
Over the last few months, FDA has continued its efforts to encourage and facilitate the use of the agency’s Expanded Access Program (EAP). This follows other FDA EAP actions, including its announcement of program improvements.
The US Supreme Court held on May 20 that a judge, not a jury, must decide the question of whether federal law prohibited drug manufacturers from adding warnings to the drug label that would satisfy state law.
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an updated draft guidance on March 7 on the nonproprietary naming of biologics, titled Nonproprietary Naming of Biological Products: Update.
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency) on January 30 signaled what could be an about-face with regard to its role administering the List of Approved Drug Products with Therapeutic Equivalence Evaluation (referred to as the Orange Book). Historically, FDA’s Orange Book role has been solely ministerial. However, over the next year, FDA may begin taking a more active approach to the Orange Book.
Human cell and gene therapy research has advanced dramatically in recent years and opened the door to potential treatments for diseases once considered incurable.
After several delays, the revised US Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (also known as the Common Rule) went into effect on January 21.
FDA recently signaled that it plans to be more involved in facilitating expanded access to investigational new drugs. This follows the agency’s announcement of its efforts to improve and clarify the expanded access program (EAP), as well as state and federal legislation intended to simplify the process to use investigational drugs for treatment purposes.