Choose Site
The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) recently issued guidance consolidating current FinCEN regulations, rulings, and guidance about cryptocurrencies and money services businesses (MSBs) under the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA).
As readers of our blog are aware, courts and regulators are playing catch-up when it comes to cryptocurrencies, and to interpreting existing laws and regulations as applied to these new and innovative offerings.
It’s here. The Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation have released a proposed rule (Proposed Rule) that would make important modifications to Section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act, commonly known as “the Volcker Rule.”
Recent events in the cryptocurrency markets, including the wild swings in the trading prices of bitcoin, the growing incidence of initial coin offerings (ICOs) entailing the offer and sale of unregistered securities, and the launch of bitcoin futures trading, have encouraged the federal government to ratchet up its interest in virtual currencies.
In the closely watched case PHH Corporation v. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a panel of the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has held that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB’s) structure is unconstitutional but that the constitutional flaw is remedied simply by striking the CFPB provision that authorizes the statute restricting the US president’s power to remove its director except “for cause.”
On July 19, the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), a bureau within the US Department of the Treasury responsible for the Bank Secrecy Act, issued guidance in the form of frequently asked questions (FAQs) regarding its recently adopted customer due diligence requirements (CDD Rule).
Senators Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Mark Warner (D-VA), along with Representative Elijah Cummings (D-MD), introduced new legislation that would amend the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA) to require the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) to impose fees, increase civil penalties, mandate that FX swaps and FX forwards be treated as swaps (reversing the Treasury Determination), and tighten swap data reporting and capital requirements, among other new obligations.
Starting August 1, violations of financial regulations will come with higher civil money penalties (CMPs).
The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), the bureau of the US Department of the Treasury responsible for oversight and enforcement of the Bank Secrecy Act (BSA), has issued an interim final rule (Rule) that significantly increases the statutory penalties for various violations of the BSA and its applicable regulations.
Last Friday, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) issued a notice stating that, effective in less than 70 days (July 31), broker-dealers will no longer be able to engage in leveraged foreign exchange (forex or FX) business with persons other than “eligible contract participants” as defined in Section 1a(18) of the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA), including those that are dually registered with the US Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) as Futures Commission Merchants (FCMs).