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FERC, CFTC, and State Energy Law Developments
In response to concerns that the ability of the electric system to provide frequency response following a system disturbance is falling across the United States, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) changed its generation interconnection requirements on February 15.
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued an order on January 18 approving four Emergency Operations (EOP) reliability standards
On December 15, 2017, the California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, issued its opinion in Southern California Gas Co. v. Superior Court of Los Angeles County. In reversing the lower court’s decision, the appeals court concluded that Southern California Gas Co. (SoCalGas) could not be held liable in tort for economic damages in the absence of a transactional relationship unless its actions caused personal injury or property damage.
On January 8, 2018, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued an order rejecting the US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) proposed changes to organized market rules that would have permitted certain baseload resources with at least 90 days of on-site fuel to be paid a cost-of-service rate rather than relying on compensation under market-determined prices.

Under a notice of proposed rulemaking to be released today, December 21, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is proposing to direct the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) to revise the Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) reliability standards to require electric utilities to report all cyberattacks on the electric security perimeters surrounding their key electric infrastructure as well as the associated electronic access control and monitoring devices that protect those perimeters. 

In an admonishing response letter issued December 8, US Secretary of Energy Rick Perry granted the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC) request for a 30-day extension to consider final action on its Proposed Grid Reliability and Resiliency Pricing Rules.
Today, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Office of Enforcement (OE) issued its 2017 Report on Enforcement. The report provides a review of OE’s activities during fiscal year 2017, which begins October 1 and ends September 30 annually, revealing likely areas of focus for FERC enforcement in the coming year.
The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) filed a petition on September 26 requesting approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or the Commission) for a suite of Reliability Standards that focus on vulnerabilities in vendor products and services and would regulate the utility procurement process.
On September 29, Secretary of Energy Rick Perry invoked rarely used statutory authority to direct the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to initiative a rulemaking to enable generation assets in RTOs and ISOs to receive payments for reliability and resiliency benefits that DOE views as uncompensated under current market rules.
On September 12, 2017, FERC and NERC released a joint statement and guidance encouraging ongoing interutility cooperation among all utilities in response to Hurricane Irma, which ravaged areas in Florida and Georgia, neighboring states, Puerto Rico, and US territories in the Caribbean.