FERC, CFTC, and State Energy Law Developments

On February 17, 2017, California Senate President pro Tempore Kevin de León (D-Los Angeles) proposed legislation (SB 584) that would require California to generate 100% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2045. The bill also would require California to reach an interim goal of 50% renewable by the end of 2025, accelerating the 50%-by-2030 mandate currently in place. If approved, SB 584 would match Hawaii’s renewable portfolio standard (RPS), which is currently the most aggressive RPS in the United States.

Read the full LawFlash on our website.

At its last open meeting on Jan. 19, 2017, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a policy statement that serves to reaffirm FERC’s efforts to encourage the development of electric storage resources. Of all the publications from FERC so far in calendar year 2017, this policy statement is one of the most important for entities in the electric power sector.

Read the full article.

Energy partner Ken Kulak recently participated in an Energy Policy Now podcast produced by the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania. During the podcast, Ken discussed the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC’s) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) on electric storage, highlighting several issues raised in the NOPR regarding the development of “participation models” for electric storage and distributed energy resources in organized electricity markets. Comments to the FERC NOPR are due by February 13, 2017.

Across the United States, there is a growing interest in distributed generation, which produces electricity in small quantities near the point of use, rather than in large amounts in a few places. Yet, distributed generation presents certain challenges for investor-owned utilities, independent power producers, and state and federal regulators. The integration of distributed generation resources onto the electric grid on a wide scale may dramatically impact utility investment and operations.

During this one-hour webinar, our presenters discussed distributed generation resources, their impact on utilities, and relevant policy considerations.

Topics included:

  • The benefits of distributed generation
  • The financial effect of distributed generation on utilities and customers
  • Grid operation and security issues
  • Jurisdictional and regulatory issues

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Listen to the recording >>