TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
In a recent post, we noted that the US federal government has become increasingly concerned about the security of Internet of Things (IoT) devices. On November 15, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued guidance to help stakeholders account for security in the development, manufacturing, implementation, and use of IoT devices.
Recent attempted cyberattacks that used Internet of Things (IoT) devices to effect the attempted attacks have led to growing concern within the federal government over the security of such devices and the potential such devices have to launch future attacks.
On October 6, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler released a factsheet outlining proposed rules aimed at protecting broadband consumers’ privacy, which would apply to internet service providers (ISPs) and cover data collection, usage, security, and breach notification.
As of September 30, Russian state authorities now reject tender submissions for supply of certain foreign electronic equipment if there are two concurrent submissions for supply of locally produced equipment. The ban applies to 113 types of equipment, including personal computers, printers, memory cards, mobile and landline phones, TV sets, cameras, microphones, and cash and ATM machines.
As part of our Sourcing and Technology Lunchtime Series, partners Michael Pillion and Peter Watt-Morse recently spoke during their webinar “The Next Frontier: How Robots and Automation are Changing Outsourcing and Technology Agreements.”
According to a recent global study , integrating Internet of Things (IoT) technologies into core business processes is surging, and 76% of organizations surveyed say IoT will be “critical” to future success.
The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently warned that Internet of Things (IoT) products and services that are no longer operational, updated, or supported present significant issues related to consumer expectations, security, and privacy.
Senator Mark Warner of Virginia recently sent a letter to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) expressing concern over the potential explosion of collection, storage, and usage of children’s personal information in connection with the Internet of Things (IoT), including mobile apps and so-called “smart toys.” In the letter, Senator Warner noted that the scope and duration of data collection is expanding rapidly, enabled by the falling cost of digital storage and internet connectivity, and “more and more Internet-connected devices are making their way into children’s hands.” Thus, seemingly simple everyday purchases—such as toys—could raise complex privacy and safety issues that consumers may struggle with or not fully comprehend.
Mark Rosekind, chief of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), recently announced that the NHTSA will release documents to serve as a framework for national regulations concerning automated and autonomous vehicles.
On April 27, the US Senate Commerce Committee approved the Developing Innovation and Growing the Internet of Things Act (DIGIT Act) with the intent to help the United States capitalize on potential economic opportunities and benefits that growing the Internet of Things (IoT) can offer.