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TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
Experts tasked by the EU to help “unleash” the economic potential of cloud computing are now working on how to address common issues among cloud users and providers through model contract terms.
Snapchat, a popular smartphone application, recently settled with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) over allegations that the app misrepresented material elements of its program to the public.
The fog is starting to lift for website operators who have been navigating under murky rules for months.
Just when we were getting used to the "cloud" way of things, new buzzwords are emerging to brand solutions that may replace (or more likely enhance) cloud computing.
New regulations from the Office of Federal Contractor Compliance Programs (OFCCP) took effect on March 24, impacting contracts between federal contractors and subcontractors.
As the outsourcing industry matures and contracts run their full cycles, we have seen an influx of deals that are expiring or up for renegotiation or resourcing.
A recent jury finding in Energy Transfer Partners LP v. Enterprise Products Partners LP may have far-reaching effects in how relationships formed through nonbinding letters of intent are interpreted, specifically regarding whether conduct can negate a previous agreement between parties.
The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently voted to make available for public comment a proposal on protecting and promoting an open Internet, and in particular, the concept of “net neutrality.” The FCC’s May 15 proposal stems from its conclusion that “broadband providers have the incentive and ability to act in ways that threaten Internet openness” and two previous invalidated attempts to impose protections.
As a result of new regulations, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has greater authority to regulate drug manufacturers for failing to have adequate controls around supply chain management, including the authority to impose penalties.
After six months of being held up by the lumbering technology world, agile lawmakers see an end in sight.