Legal Insights and Perspectives for the Healthcare Industry
While US healthcare institutions are poised to respond to any outbreak of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), how should they prepare as employers for the questions and compliance challenges that arise in a public health crisis?
Our global employment and immigration team details a number of recent developments with important implications for the US healthcare industry.
The Morgan Lewis Labor & Employment NOW video series provides analysis of the latest legal developments and compliance insight for employers. In this edition, Doug Hart discusses staffing-related trends that arise in collective bargaining in the healthcare industry. Doug offers guidance to hospitals and healthcare facilities to better understand unions’ bargaining positions and determine appropriate employer responses, focusing on in-house registries, float pools, ratios, contract language, and wage and hour concerns.
Healthcare is the largest labor market in the United States, employing over 18 million workers.
The US District Court for the District of Oregon on November 2 issued a temporary restraining order (TRO) to block the new health insurance requirement for immigrant visa applicants from taking effect on November 3, 2019.
A final rule released by the US Department of Homeland Security will make it more difficult for foreign nationals who use public benefits to adjust or extend their immigration status in the United States based on their likelihood of becoming a “public charge” in the future.
In this LawFlash, our US labor/management relations team tracks new developments at the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) as 2019 progresses.

Nearly 20% of healthcare workers are immigrants according to the results of a June 2019 study that underscores the major contributions immigrants make to the US healthcare system. To learn more about how the US Department of State is regulating immigrant visa availability and adjusting the flow of status adjustments and consular immigrant visa application filings and approvals, please see our recent alert on the August 2019 visa bulletin.

Two Texas cities—Dallas and San Antonio—will soon require employers to offer paid sick leave effective August 1, 2019.