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TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
According to recent guidance from the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC), providers of health apps and connected devices that collect consumers’ health information must comply with the FTC’s Health Breach Notification Rule, 16 CFR Part 318, and therefore are required to notify consumers and others when their health data is breached.

As the availability and variety of digital health tools continue to increase, evidence is also being presented that those tools are having a meaningful impact on health outcomes. A recent report, Digital Health Trends 2021: Innovation, Evidence, Regulation, and Adoption, offered by the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science, looks at the proliferation of digital health tools, recent innovations in the market, and contributions and barriers to their adoption.

Please join us for a two-part webinar series on key legal, employment, and regulatory trends and issues impacting the European life sciences market.
Companies developing digital therapeutics, clinical decision support apps, and other digital health technologies for use in the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic should be mindful of FDA’s quickly evolving policies and guidance affecting such technologies. In our recent LawFlash, FDA Regulation of COVID-19 Apps, Digital Therapeutics, and other Digital Health Technologies, we examine recent FDA developments and their implications for companies in the digital health space.
The German Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) has determined the suitability of an industry-specific security standard (B3S) with which hospitals can align their IT security measures. The B3S standard was developed by the German Hospital Association (DKG).
Please join us for the next installment of the Morgan Lewis Life Sciences Growth Webinar series, which will focus on university licensing.
The Q2 2019 issue of Morgan Lewis’s Life Sciences International Review was recently released. The review includes updates relevant to the life sciences industry from across the world, including the United States, Europe, and Asia. The topics range from intellectual property and data privacy to international trade and labor and employment.
No one knows at the moment what the relationship will be between the United Kingdom and the European Union the day after Brexit on 31 October.
In Part 1 of this series, we provided an overview of data (or knowledge) commons and some key issues to consider, but how does one actually create and manage a data commons? To find your feet in this budding field, build on the theoretical foundation; address the specific context (including perceived objectives and constraints); deal with the thorny issues (including control and change); establish a core set of principles and rules; and, perhaps most importantly, plan for and enable change.
You may have heard of the “tragedy of the commons,” where a resource is depleted through collective action, but knowledge is different from other resources—knowledge can be duplicated, aggregated, integrated, analyzed, stored, shared, and disseminated in countless ways.