TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS

As businesses across America begin to reopen in the wake of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many will likely implement new social distancing and sanitization procedures. That got us thinking about how companies may choose to use touchless authorization technologies like facial recognition as the main form of entry into their facilities, rather than continuing to use tools such as keypads or fingerprint scanners that require many people to repeatedly touch the same surfaces daily.

We hope to see you for our annual series—now in its 10th year—of tailored webinars focused on current technology issues, trends, and developments that are of key importance to our friends and clients.

This year, the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic provides unique challenges for the technology sector. We will address these issues across our full slate of programming, as well as in a dedicated COVID-19 track of events.

Select programs will include:

  • The Fourth Industrial Revolution: What Do Automation and Outsourcing in the 21st Century Mean for the Modern Workplace?
  • Successful Cyberincident Response in 2020
  • Contract Corner: The Year in Review (covering our Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis Contract Corner series)
  • Business Processes Outsourcing: Tricks and Tips from the Russian Law Perspective
  • IP Year in Review: Important Cases Decided in 2019
  • COVID-19 Exposes New Supply Chain Risks
  • Effect of COVID-19 on the Fintech Sector

See the full schedule of events >

New York’s Department of Financial Services (DFS) issued guidance on April 13 alerting regulated entities of the significant increase in cybercrime during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

Specifically, DFS noted several cybersecurity risks resulting from the realities of a remote workforce. With the increase of remote working, companies have issued new devices to employees and in many cases allow employees to use their personal devices to remotely access company information. These practices understandably subject companies to increased risk of phishing attacks and the leak of confidential information. Remote connections need to be as secure as possible using mechanisms like Multi-Factor Authentication and secure VPN connections so that data is safely and properly encrypted in transit. Regulated entities should be sure that all devices have the necessary and proper security software and that employees are trained properly on how to use applications securely.

Please join us for a discussion of how the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic will affect existing and future outsourcing contracts and relationships. Partners Barbara Melby, Michael Pillion, and Mike Pierides will discuss the following topics:

  • Excused events and associated provisions
  • Business continuity: then, now, and going forward
  • Remote working blessings and challenges
  • Scalability and change
  • Step in, termination, and renegotiation

We hope you’ll join us on Tuesday, April 28, at 12:00–1:00 pm ET, 9:00-10:00 am PT, and 5:00-6:00 pm BST.

Register for the webinar now >>

There are two primary models by which vendors will make software available to customers (1) software as a service (SaaS); and (2) on premise. In a SaaS model, the vendor provides, maintains, and hosts (either itself or through a hosting SaaS vendor) the desired software, and grants the customer access to the software functionality via the internet. In an on-premise model, however, the vendor will deliver the software (either physically or through a file transfer system) for the customer to install on its servers behind the customer’s firewall.

Please join us for an in-depth discussion on how to successfully renegotiate your existing services contracts with technology, outsourcing, and commercial transactions partner Vito Petretti. Topics will include:

  • A general look at the renegotiation process
  • Business issues and drivers involved in renegotiation
  • How to conduct a renegotiation
  • Contract terms that may impact renegotiation

We hope you’ll join us on Wednesday, April 8, 2020, from 12:00–1:00 pm ET.

Register Now

One of the major changes introduced by the Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security (SHIELD) Act, which was signed into New York law last year, is scheduled to take effect this week.

The SHIELD Act modernized New York’s laws by (1) expanding the data elements that may trigger data breach notification to include certain biometric information, user names or email addresses, and account, credit card, or debit card numbers, if circumstances would permit account access without a security code or other information; (2) broadening the definition of a breach to include unauthorized “access” (in addition to unauthorized “acquisition”); and (3) creating a new reasonable security requirement for companies to “develop, implement and maintain reasonable safeguards to protect the security, confidentiality and integrity of” the private information of New York residents. The first two changes took effect on October 23, 2019, while the third will take effect on March 21, 2020.

The Financial Stability Board (FSB) published on December 9, 2019, its report on financial institutions’ increasing reliance on third parties to provide cloud computing services (the Report). Established by the G-20 in April 2009 to promote international financial stability, the FSB is an international body that assesses vulnerabilities in the global financial system and coordinates the work of national financial authorities and international standard-setting organizations to develop and promote appropriate regulatory and supervisory policies.

The Report outlines the benefits from the increasing use of third-party cloud computing services, focusing primarily on cost savings, improved competition and cybersecurity, and increased operational resilience. It notes, though, the new challenges that the current scale of use may pose, such as the significant and systemic effects that an operational failure of critical third-party infrastructure could have. This is due to the highly concentrated cloud computing sector and the increasingly complex network of third-party suppliers and dependencies.

Trainee associate Valeria Gaikovich contributed to this post.

Following adoption of the law on the preinstallation of Russian software on electronic devices in December 2019, the Russian Federal Antimonopoly Service (FAS) has developed draft guidelines to determine the types of electronic devices that will be subject to the new regulations, as well as the deadlines and procedures for the preinstallation of domestic software. The draft guidelines will not apply to electronic devices manufactured or released into circulation in Russia before July 1, 2020.

According to the draft guidelines, as of the dates set forth below, all touchscreen electronic devices with two or more functions (e.g., smartphones, tablets, smart watches) must have the following apps preinstalled:

Please join us in our Philadelphia office for our annual Technology, Outsourcing & Commercial Contracts Networking Roundtable. The roundtable will feature an in-depth discussion of hot topics relating to the increased connectivity of our businesses, including privacy concerns, data rights, cloud solutions, and contracting for the use of connected devices. Stay connected with us at the networking reception following the discussions.

We hope you’ll join us in Philadelphia on Thursday, April 16, 2020, from 3:30–5:30 pm ET.

Register now >>