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It is apparent from the extensive investigation of defined benefit plans on the part of the US Department of Labor (DOL) that the DOL is quite focused on timely payment of plan benefits to participants.
On March 6, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) issued Notice 2019-18, which would allow sponsors of defined benefit pension plans to offer retirees in pay status the opportunity to elect a lump sum payment in lieu of continued annuity payments.
A recent case provides a reminder for plan administrators of the importance of complying with Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (COBRA) notice obligations and a good excuse to review health plan COBRA procedures.
Longtime observers of the twists and turns of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) have seen this before—namely, yet another dramatic chapter in the almost 10-year journey of the ACA.
The IRS on December 4 released Notice 2018-95, which provides transition relief to tax-exempt 403(b) plan sponsors that may not have complied with the “universal availability” rule for part-time employees.
Now that two weeks have passed since the Internal Revenue Service released its proposed hardship regulations, most defined contribution plan sponsors have determined which changes to their plan's hardship programs (if any) will be effective beginning January 1, 2019 (for calendar year plans), and which changes will be postponed.
With 2018 coming to a close, retirement plan sponsors should make sure they have addressed any required year-end plan amendments, are preparing any required year-end participant notices, and are looking ahead to any changes in 2019 that may impact their plans. This post focuses on the 2019 changes, while Part 1: Closing Out 2018 concentrated on 2018 year-end obligations.
As 2018 comes to a close, it’s time for retirement plan sponsors to make sure they have addressed any required year-end plan amendments, are preparing any required year-end participant notices, and are looking ahead to any changes in 2019 that may impact their plans.
The US Internal Revenue Service has released proposed regulations requiring retirement plans to eliminate the six-month suspension for hardship withdrawals made on and after January 1, 2020, with the option to eliminate it earlier, and providing important clarifications for plan sponsors on other hardship requirements.
Drafting and negotiating data protection provisions in services agreements is critical, but it can also be one of the trickier and more time-consuming aspects of the contracting process.