FERC, CFTC, and State Energy Law Developments

As we reported in December 2018, to jumpstart the energy storage market as envisioned by Governor Andrew M. Cuomo, the New York Public Service Commission (NYPSC) issued an order establishing an aggressive 3 GW energy storage goal by 2030, with an interim target of 1.5 GW by 2025, and directing investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) to engage in competitive procurements for energy storage. The IOUs will issue draft requests for proposals (RFPs) this summer following a stakeholder process that kicks off on March 29.

In response to state legislation enacted last year, the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (BPU) is seeking comments concerning the state of and prognosis for energy storage development within the State of New Jersey. New Jersey enacted the Clean Energy Act on May 23, 2018. Among other things, the act requires the BPU, in consultation with the regional grid operator, PJM Interconnection, LLC, and other stakeholders, to conduct an energy storage analysis and submit a written report on energy storage to the governor and legislature by May 23, 2019.

Effective April 1, energy storage resources will have more options to participate in ISO New England’s (ISO-NE’s) markets, subject to new rules accommodating storage resources that were approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on February 25. The new market rules reflect a first of their kind in ISO-NE, and are a product of ISO-NE’s work to build on existing rules initially designed for pumped storage hydroelectric resources.

The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (BPU) recently released its first annual report on the development of offshore wind in New Jersey (the Report). The Report comes one year after Governor Phil Murphy released Executive Order No. 8, which directed the BPU and other agencies to implement the Offshore Wind Economic Development Act (OWEDA).

The New York State Public Service Commission (PSC) has issued an order establishing a statewide goal of 3.0 GW of energy storage deployments by 2030—with an interim target of 1.5 GW by 2025—and related reforms to encourage that development.

The order is the latest step in a broader plan being implemented by state authorities to dramatically boost the presence of energy storage in New York. In November 2017, the state legislature enacted a law directing the PSC to establish a statewide energy storage goal for 2030. In January 2018, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced a target of 1.5 GW of deployed energy storage by 2025. In mid-2018, PSC staff and the New York State Energy Research Development Authority (NYSERDA) jointly developed the New York State Energy Storage Roadmap (Roadmap) to provide the PSC with recommendations on the policies, regulations, and initiatives needed to meet those targets.

For years, the US electric power industry has witnessed a steady uptick in the total capacity of deployed energy storage resources. Part of that growth is attributable to more favorable economics for storage projects, a trend that is set to continue in the coming years—a recent study by Bloomberg NEF forecasted that the global energy storage industry will see $620 billion in new investments by 2040. While the development of stationary batteries is expected to be outpaced by other storage applications, such as electric vehicles, the study also suggests that rapidly sliding capital costs for battery systems will be advantageous for utility-scale projects.

A new market registration option is among the changes SPP is likely to propose in next month’s mandatory compliance filing.

We reported last week on steps that ISO New England has taken to finalize tariff revisions to meet the directives of Order No. 841, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s (FERC or Commission) final rule on electric storage participation in Independent System Operator (ISO) and Regional Transmission Organization (RTO) markets. Order No. 841 requires RTOs and ISOs to submit proposed models that permit electric storage resources to participate in organized capacity, energy, and ancillary service markets by December 3, 2018 (read a more comprehensive overview of the final rule here). At the end of October, Southwest Power Pool, Inc. (SPP) moved closer towards meeting that goal when its board approved tariff revisions developed in response to FERC’s Order No. 841 directives, which should represent new opportunities for some of the 2.5 GW of pending electric storage resources in SPP’s generator interconnection queue.

Revisions aim to build on framework designed originally for pumped-storage hydro facilities and bring region closer to Order No. 841 compliance.

Earlier this year, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC or Commission) issued Electric Storage Participation in Markets Operated by Regional Transmission Organizations and Independent System Operators (Order No. 841), a final rule amending FERC’s regulations to facilitate participation of electric storage resources in the capacity, energy, and ancillary service markets operated by regional transmission organizations (RTOs) and independent system operators (ISOs). As we reported previously, Order No. 841 requires RTOs and ISOs to devise an electric storage resource participation model that meets certain general criteria. The RTOs/ISOs must file the tariff revisions directed by Order No. 841 by December 3, 2018, and implement those changes, if approved, by December 3, 2019.

The August 2018 enactment of the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act (FIRRMA) came after more than two years of debate over the appropriate scope of jurisdiction for the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS). Much has already been written about FIRRMA and its potentially ambitious reach, as well as about the interest by certain parties, including members of Congress, to keep CFIUS away from some transactions. The result was a law that amended a number of provisions defining CFIUS jurisdiction, both expanding and narrowing key parts of the Committee’s reach. The pilot program is focused on certain specific types of transactions, without regard to the country of the acquiring entity, that CFIUS can review under FIRRMA, including transactions involving “Nuclear Electric Power Generation;” “Petrochemical Manufacturing;” “Power, Distribution and Specialty Transformer Manufacturing;” “Storage Battery Manufacturing;” and “Turbine and Turbine Generator Set Units Manufacturing.”

Read the LawFlash.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission issued a final rule revising the Large Generator Interconnection Procedures and Large Generator Interconnection Agreement. The changes are intended to provide increased certainty and additional interconnection service options to generation interconnection customers, while also enhancing the information available for interconnection decisionmaking. Transmission providers will be required to submit compliance filings. Read the full LawFlash.