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TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
A frequent point of contention between parties negotiating the allocation of risk related to intellectual property rights in connection with the acquisition of intellectual property is the interplay between the warranty and indemnification sections. Below we break down what to look for in these sections and how minor changes in the language can significantly change the rights a party is granting or receiving.
When in-house lawyers start thinking about how to support a business client that is looking to implement a new or replacement enterprise resource platform (or more commonly known as an ERP system), we often suggest that they first discuss these 10 framework issues to get a sense of the scale, complexity, and timing of the potential transaction.
In Part 1 of this Contract Corner on Software as a Service (SaaS) agreements, we discussed ownership and use issues in SaaS transactions where the application is provided and hosted as a dedicated instance with common base software (sometimes with customization or variation) but running as a separate instance in a dedicated environment.
Blog In the typical SaaS scenario, the SaaS vendor provides, maintains, and hosts (either itself or through a hosting SaaS vendor) the desired application layer, and grants the customer and its authorized users access to the application functionality via the internet. At a high level, there are two variations of this scenario.
Part 1 of this three-part series discusses intellectual property ownership rights in the absence of another agreement. Part 2 addresses some of the common ways that parties can allocate the ownership of intellectual property in a contract. This third part covers a few best practices that will help ensure that a company owns its intellectual property.
In Part 1 of this three-part series, we discussed how intellectual property ownership is determined in the U.S. if no agreement is in place. In this second part, we discuss the typical ways that parties can use contracts to determine intellectual property ownership.
Protecting intellectual property rights is a critical component to the success of a technology company. In order for a tech company to determine how to protect its intellectual property, the company should understand how the key intellectual property rights work. In this Part 1 of a three-part series, we discuss how patent, copyright, and trade secret ownership works in the United States if there is no agreement in place to allocate these rights.
It is easy to skim over your contracts’ insurance provisions or simply defer to risk experts, but here are a few questions you might want to consider the next time you review the insurance section of a contract.

It is important to periodically review form agreements to ensure that the provisions that were favorable or represented your company’s position in the past continue to accurately protect your company’s interests.

Everybody does it. We may say that we only use the “customer’s paper” when contracting, but we know that is often not the case when entering into licenses for commercially available, off-the-shelf (COTS) software products.