TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS

As we start 2022, as part of our Spotlight series, we connect with Reece Hirsch, the co-head of Morgan Lewis’s privacy and cybersecurity practice, to discuss the recent policy statement issued by the US Federal Trade Commission regarding the Health Breach Notification Rule and how it applies to health app developers that handle consumers’ sensitive health information. Our Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis blog also published a summary of the policy statement.

As 2021 comes to a close, we have once again compiled all the links to our Contract Corner blog posts, a regular feature of Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis. In these posts, members of our global technology, outsourcing, and commercial transactions practice highlight particular contract provisions, review the issues, and propose negotiating and drafting tips.
Broad awareness has been made about cyberattacks in the form of phishing that typically use email messages to lure victims into divulging sensitive information or opening a link that allows malware to infiltrate their device. Companies have learned how to combat phishing by training employees to recognize such scam attempts and report them as phishing to protect their organizations. “Vishing” is another tactic used by scammers that, while less familiar, is no less invasive and dangerous.
With the exponential growth of cyber threats, cloud computing and remote working, contract provisions regarding data security requirements have also expanded in size and frequency. It has become common practice to prepare schedules to detail (and limit) security requirements. Customers and vendors both have a vested interest in clearly identifying expectations and obligations for such requirements. In this week’s Contract Corner, we explore considerations when it comes to drafting security schedules.
According to recent guidance from the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC), providers of health apps and connected devices that collect consumers’ health information must comply with the FTC’s Health Breach Notification Rule, 16 CFR Part 318, and therefore are required to notify consumers and others when their health data is breached.
It has become increasingly clear that improving cybersecurity will be a main focus, and important goal, of the Biden-Harris administration.

With high-profile ransomware attacks occurring over the last few months, cybersecurity is back on the agenda in Washington, DC. We invite you to an upcoming webinar during which Morgan Lewis partners Ezra Church, Kristin Hadgis, and Daniel Skees will review recent actions taken by the Biden-Harris administration to address cybersecurity threats to critical infrastructure and to enhance the protection of sensitive data. They will also consider how the administration’s approach could affect future regulatory initiatives.

We recently highlighted the Morgan Lewis financial services team’s overview of proposed guidance released by the three federal banking agencies with respect to third-party relationships within the fintech industry. The federal banking agencies, though, are not alone when it comes to guidance on third-party vendors.

As further guidance and regulations are proposed and begin to take shape with respect to relationships between banking organizations and third parties, including those in the fintech industry, our multidisciplinary teams here at Morgan Lewis are tracking each development. In July, shortly after the three federal banking agencies (the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency) released their proposed risk management guidance regarding third-party relationships, our banking and financial services team provided a general overview highlighting the key takeaways from the proposal. If you have any specific questions, please reach out to your Morgan Lewis team for assistance.

As a reminder, China’s new Data Security Law (DSL), which entails more expansive and restrictive requirements on data localization, mandatory security level certification, and severe penalties for unauthorized foreign transfer of data, will come into effect on September 1, 2021. The DSL will potentially affect all business operators in China, including multinational corporations. Our privacy and cybersecurity team recently published a more detailed analysis of the DSL. If you have any specific questions, don’t hesitate to reach out to your Morgan Lewis contact for assistance.

Read the full LawFlash >>