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FERC, CFTC, and State Energy Law Developments
The retail storage incentives will be available for storage projects that operate primarily to reduce a customer’s electric demand to off-peak periods and discharge during peaks to relieve grid constraints.
In response to state legislation enacted last year, the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (BPU) is seeking comments concerning the state of and prognosis for energy storage development within the State of New Jersey.
The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (BPU) recently released its first annual report on the development of offshore wind in New Jersey (the Report). The Report comes one year after Governor Phil Murphy released Executive Order No. 8, which directed the BPU and other agencies to implement the Offshore Wind Economic Development Act (OWEDA).
The New Jersey Board of Public Utilities (BPU) approved the nation’s largest single-state offshore wind solicitation in the United States on September 17, 2018, with an Order opening up an application window for the solicitation of 1,100 megawatts (MW) of offshore wind capacity.

The New York State Public Service Commission (PSC) has issued an order establishing a statewide goal of 3.0 GW of energy storage deployments by 2030—with an interim target of 1.5 GW by 2025—and related reforms to encourage that development.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued an order on the Minimum Offer Price Rule (MOPR) in the PJM Interconnection, L.L.C. (PJM) tariff on June 29, addressing recent controversies over the capacity market impact of some generators receiving state rate subsidies.
The heads of 12 federal agencies signed an MOU on April 9 committing to “a more predictable, transparent and timely Federal review and authorization process for delivering major infrastructure projects.” The signatory agencies, all of which have responsibilities to review or authorize infrastructure projects, agreed to take certain steps to create a more coordinated and streamlined federal environmental review process.
The renewable energy industry, now designated as a technology and innovation-related area of special concern to the protection of the US industrial and scientific base
In response to concerns that the ability of the electric system to provide frequency response following a system disturbance is falling across the United States, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) changed its generation interconnection requirements on February 15.
The Kleinman Center for Energy Policy invited energy practice partner Ken Kulak to discuss corporate America’s efforts to deepen their clean energy commitments during a recent episode of podcast Energy Now.