Choose Site
TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS

An annual survey found that the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has influenced decisions made by state chief information officers (CIOs) in 2020 in all areas addressed by the survey. The 2020 State CIO Survey (the Survey) released by the National Association of State Chief Information Officers, Grant Thornton Public Sector LLC and CompTIA (Sponsoring Organizations) was conducted several weeks after the start of COVID-19 and includes the responses from 47 state and territory CIOs.

The US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) recently released a report titled “Public Views on Artificial Intelligence and Intellectual Property Policy,” which addresses the impact of artificial intelligence (AI) on various intellectual property (IP) regimes. Per the USPTO’s press release announcing the report, the report “represents the agency’s firm commitment to keeping pace with this rapidly changing and critical technology.”

On Monday 21 September, the UK High Court (Patents) delivered its judgment on the DABUS appeal, as previously reported here by Morgan Lewis.

Justice Marcus Smith dismissed the appeal brought by physicist Stephen Thaler, who claimed that his artificially intelligent (AI) creation, DABUS, had produced inventions on its own initiative. The dismissal follows a chain of disappointment for Dr. Thaler; the UK Intellectual Property Office (UKIPO), European Patent Office (EPO) and US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) all denied his initial patent applications in 2018 and 2019.

On 7 September 2020, the UK government published a call for views on the future relationship between artificial intelligence (AI) and intellectual property (IP). Though the government called for views on all areas of intellectual property law, this article shall focus on patent law.

Bias issues in AI decisionmaking have become increasingly problematic in recent years, as many companies increase the use of AI systems across their operations. On one hand, AI can help reduce the impact of human biases in decisionmaking. On the other, AI can make the bias problem worse.

AI systems learn to make decisions based on the data and algorithms humans put into them. Often, AI systems inherit human biases because they are trained on data containing human decisions. Evidence suggests that "AI models can embed human and societal biases and deploy them at scale."

As businesses across America begin to reopen in the wake of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many will likely implement new social distancing and sanitization procedures. That got us thinking about how companies may choose to use touchless authorization technologies like facial recognition as the main form of entry into their facilities, rather than continuing to use tools such as keypads or fingerprint scanners that require many people to repeatedly touch the same surfaces daily.

With more than 40 webinars total, the annual Morgan Lewis Technology May-rathon continues. We thought these particular webinars were especially timely with regard to topics we follow in Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis:

See the full schedule of remaining May-rathon events >>

Please join us for our first webinar of the year where Morgan Lewis partner Barbara Melby will discuss the top trends that will impact the outsourcing market in 2020. Topics will include:

  • Forecasts of where the outsourcing market is going
  • Outsourcing as a way to disrupt business operations
  • The impact of cloud, automation, and AI on outsourcing transactions
  • A look at the “Partner Ecosystem”
  • Focus on customer experience and outcomes

The webinar will take place on Wednesday, January 15, 2020, from 12:00 to 1:00 pm (Eastern Time). Register for the webinar.

The importance of cybersecurity in the autonomous vehicle setting is well known, but nuance and complexity will be on our LiDAR (a pulsed laser that measures ranges) where the rubber meets the road.

The Challenging, Shifting Landscape

Cybersecurity is one of the key issues of the digital age, typically in the context of security and privacy of confidential or personal data. Cybersecurity is particularly challenging and important for technologies such as self-driving cars, where the real world and the digital, connected world meet and where cyber breaches could result in danger to life and property.

Autonomous vehicles are still in their infancy. Significant uncertainty surrounds this rapidly evolving ecosystem. Standards and regulations are still in a state of flux, and the “rules of the game” are still unclear: how, and how long, will human drivers/operators continue to be involved (along with their proclivity for risky, unpredictable and gullible behavior)? At this relative stage of immaturity, market participants are developing their own divergent solutions that will eventually need to seamlessly integrate, increasing the potential for cyber vulnerabilities. However, the opportunity (for both innovators and society at large) is clear, as smart, interconnected vehicles and systems promise remarkable improvements in efficiency and safety. The race is on.

We found interesting a recent Forbes article by Cody McLain that discussed the top trends to watch in the business process outsourcing (BPO) industry. The article highlighted the following four trends for 2019.

1. Increase in Process Automation

As artificial intelligence (AI) expands to nearly every aspect of our lives, the BPO industry is also impacted and must adapt to the AI revolution. The article estimates that nearly 40% of American jobs could be lost to automation by the 2030s. While BPO companies often thrive in completing manual tasks outsourced by their clients, if AI software were able to do those same services at a fraction of the cost, then BPO companies would lose as their clients choose the more cost-effective solution. The article suggests that BPO companies should adapt to the use of AI and switch their services to work alongside AI (such as managing and maintaining AI) to stay competitive.