Choose Site
TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
Russia has amended its main laws governing the internet to allow the government to restrict access to the internet and to control internet traffic in emergency situations.
Every January, electronics manufacturers descend upon Las Vegas for the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) to showcase their latest and greatest forays in devices. Not surprisingly, there was no shortage of shiny fresh connected devices with new and evolving applications in everything from workouts and personal care to the more usual suspects of television and virtual assistants.

As 2018 comes to a close, we have once again compiled all the links to our Contract Corner blog posts, a regular feature of Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis. In these posts, members of our global technology, outsourcing, and commercial transactions practice highlight particular contract provisions, review the issues, and propose negotiating and drafting tips. If you don’t see a topic you are interested in below, please let us know, and we may feature it in a future Contract Corner.

The Pittsburgh session of the annual Cyberlaw Update for the Pennsylvania Bar Institute (PBI) will take place on Tuesday, July 17. Moderated by Morgan Lewis partner Peter Watt-Morse, the update enters its 21st year and this year’s seminar will focus on current hot-button issues including blockchain and cryptocurrency and security and privacy concerns related to social media, IOT, GDPR, and the Dark Web.
Just when we finally figured out how to contract for “cloud” services and SaaS, here comes blockchain—the next disruptor for IT, businesses and, yes, us lawyers.
The UK government recently released a policy paper outlining proposed requirements for makers of Internet of Things (IoT) devices to take certain actions to better protect IoT devices from growing cybersecurity threats.
Galvanized by a confluence of charged factors—like privacy, cybersecurity, children, and the Internet of Things (IoT)—and sparked by recent assertions of Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA) regulatory power, the US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) entered into a pioneering settlement with electronic toy manufacturer VTech regarding a breach of children’s personal information.
On June 5, 2017, the Supreme Court of the United States granted certiorari in Carpenter v. United States, a case in which the court will assess and decide the extent of the Fourth Amendment’s protection against a warrantless search and seizure of cell-site-location information (CSLI), which includes the GPS coordinates of each cell tower and the dates and times any cell phone connects to it.
In April, US President Donald Trump signed a bill rejecting Obama-era regulations on the consent needed for a broadband internet access service (BIAS) provider to use and disclose a consumer’s sensitive information—including geolocation data.
In May 2017, Senator Mark Warner of Virginia sent a letter to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) raising concerns about the security of data collected, transmitted, and/or stored by internet-connected products geared toward children. FTC acting Chairman Maureen Ohlhausen sent a response letter discussing Senator Warner’s concerns and the FTC’s enforcement of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA), and the FTC released updated guidance on COPPA compliance in late June 2017.