Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis

TECHNOLOGY TRANSACTIONS, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL CONTRACTS NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
Contract Corner
As we reach the end of 2023, we have once again compiled all of the links to our Contract Corner blog posts, a regular feature of Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis. In these posts, members of our global technology, outsourcing, and commercial transactions practice highlight particular contract provisions, review the issues, and propose negotiating and drafting tips.
Contract Corner
It is no secret that usage of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies continues to expand at a rapid pace. In fact, Flexera’s 2023 Tech Spend Pulse, which is based on a survey of 506 information technology executives across the world, found that investments in AI technologies are surging to a 68% planned increase in use. That figure was the highest of all technologies in the survey.
Morgan Lewis partners Christopher C. Archer, Anastasia Dergacheva, and J. Daniel Skees as well as associate Arjun Prasad Ramadevanahalli will discuss developments and trends in cybersecurity and digital transformation for the energy industry on Wednesday, November 29.
Deloitte has issued a biennial report that identifies trends that are impacting customer/client contact center operations. The respondents surveyed by Deloitte represented both internal- and external-facing contact centers. This blog post summarizes some key trends outlined in the report.
Contract Corner
While the regulatory landscape around artificial intelligence (AI) continues to evolve, navigating contractual arrangements and apportioning risk for the use of AI may seem like stepping into the unknown. In this blog post, we consider how a few familiar concepts within commercial contracts may be applied to the provision and use of AI tools as part of services.
The first half of 2023 was one of the most active six months for legislative and regulatory developments around artificial intelligence (AI). Our colleagues recently noted the European Parliament’s adoption of a draft AI Act as well as the significant activity in the United States related to regulating AI, both at the federal and state level. AI is also increasingly giving rise to data privacy concerns.
We recently wrote about the emerging trend of content moderation outsourcing. In this blog post, we turn our attention to another growing trend: legal process outsourcing.
Open-source software (OSS) representations and warranties are an integral part of the intellectual property (IP) representations and warranties in mergers and acquisitions (M&A) transactions and financings, as M&A transaction documents regularly include requests for a seller to represent and warrant that it has policies in place regarding the use of OSS, has provided such policies to the acquirer or investor, and has not deviated from such policies. These representations and warranties are important, but they are routinely and necessarily backstopped by the due diligence process.
The UK communications regulator and concurrent competition authority, Ofcom, announced on April 5 its proposal to refer the UK cloud services market to the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) for further investigation. This coincided with publication of the interim report of Ofcom’s market study of the largest providers of cloud services (referred to by the authority as “hyperscalers”) in the United Kingdom’s £15 billion ($18.7 billion) cloud services market.
Contract Corner
As noted in our recent blog posts, The Rise of Next-Gen Business Process Outsourcing and Key Contracting Issues to Consider, the core premise of next-gen business process outsourcing (BPO) includes (1) the leveraging of automation, bots, performance tools, and other technology to transform and optimize workflows and business processes and (2) the implementation of solutions to collect and analyze data to improve user experiences and business outcomes. Next-gen BPO drives the development and implementation of transformative technology and the generation of critical business data. As such, the identification of key intellectual property (IP) and the allocation of IP use and ownership rights invariably becomes a gating issue in contract structuring and negotiations.