Legal Insights and Perspectives for the Healthcare Industry

Did you catch our most recent edition of Fast Break? If not, we had an awesome extended session with Michele Buenafe on May 16 that was also part of our annual Technology May-rathon series. Michele described how the FDA is treating various types of software and hardware that may have healthcare functions as well as certain clinical decision support systems. Michele discussed some of the new and innovative ways that the FDA is trying to regulate—perhaps with a lighter hand—various AI and software systems that have historically had challenges with FDA oversight.

We had a successful Fast Break on HealthTech Startups last month. The program, led by Morgan Lewis corporate partners Andy Ray (@AMRayEsq) and Jeff Bodle (@jeffbodle), explored a lot of the things that might affect the relationship between capital investors, including corporate venture capital and startup entrepreneurs. We discussed a bit about the background of how a startup begins and explored the process through which a successful startup begins to obtain capital, especially when integrating vertically with potential buyers of their products (not just their business). This Fast Break also touched on some of the common healthcare regulatory issues we have to contend with on both the startup and the corporate side during diligence. If you’d like to take a listen, here is a recording of the program.

We had a really enjoyable Fast Break yesterday on a non-traditional health law topic: radioactive material regulation. As it turns out, nearly all hospitals and larger provider groups, particularly those doing imaging, oncology, or neurosurgery, routinely use or come into contact with regulated radioactive material. PET scans, for instance, which are operated by a significant number of hospitals, rely on radioactive isotopes as the basis of the imaging procedure. Morgan Lewis partner Lewis Csedrik and associate Roland Backhaus explained that providers are regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and/or similar state-based agencies (called Agreement States). Each provider has to secure a specific license for use of radioactive materials, which entails designating a radiation safety officer and establishing a radiation safety plan.

In case you’ve missed it, we’ve been running the Morgan Lewis Fast Break webinar series for more than two years now. The series examines a variety of different health law topics, from the old standards—Stark Law and Corporate Integrity Agreements, etc.—to topics on cutting-edge technology and legal developments such as Blockchain or our recent session on GDPR compliance. What we love about this series is that we get to highlight topics that may not be top of mind for many healthcare companies, helping listeners identify problems before they arise in their own practices or organizations. And as we explore these areas, we get to learn a lot as well.