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Legal Insights and Perspectives for the Healthcare Industry
Selected TopicEmployees
Members of our vaccine taskforce recently published an important Insight outlining a selection of key legal considerations and updates as the COVID-19 vaccine rollout continues to take shape, including the status of the US Food and Drug Administration’s vaccine products, distribution, key legal issues at the state level, employer mandates and employee incentives, and important liability concerns.
Our immigration colleagues recently published a LawFlash on the July 29 decision by the US District Court for the Southern District of New York to grant a preliminary nationwide injunction to temporarily block the continued implementation of the public charge rule during a public health emergency such as the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.
We invite you to join our employee benefits and labor and employment teams for a webinar focused on the reopening issues and considerations to minimize difficulties as they begin to reopen or expand their operations.
In this LawFlash our Labor, Employment, and Benefits team details the long-anticipated ruling by the US Supreme Court in Bostock v. Clayton County that held Title VII’s ban on discrimination extends to gay, lesbian, and transgender individuals.
While US healthcare institutions are poised to respond to any outbreak of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV), how should they prepare as employers for the questions and compliance challenges that arise in a public health crisis?
Our global employment and immigration team details a number of recent developments with important implications for the US healthcare industry.
The US District Court for the District of Oregon on November 2 issued a temporary restraining order (TRO) to block the new health insurance requirement for immigrant visa applicants from taking effect on November 3, 2019.
A final rule released by the US Department of Homeland Security will make it more difficult for foreign nationals who use public benefits to adjust or extend their immigration status in the United States based on their likelihood of becoming a “public charge” in the future.

Nearly 20% of healthcare workers are immigrants according to the results of a June 2019 study that underscores the major contributions immigrants make to the US healthcare system. To learn more about how the US Department of State is regulating immigrant visa availability and adjusting the flow of status adjustments and consular immigrant visa application filings and approvals, please see our recent alert on the August 2019 visa bulletin.