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Please see our recent LawFlash about this amendment, and reach out to the LawFlash authors or your Morgan Lewis contacts if you have additional questions.
With the economy humming along and unemployment at historic lows, it seems a strange time for a blog post about severance plans.
The US Supreme Court ruled on May 21 in Epic Systems Corp. v. Lewis that class and collective action waivers in employment arbitration agreements are enforceable under the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA).
Authorities in various jurisdictions are stepping up enforcement against no-poaching agreements between employers. To learn more about how employment practices may be in breach of antitrust law and steps that employers can take to protect their hiring practices from running afoul of anti-competition laws, please read our recently published LawFlash.
To help companies navigate the myriad issues arising from claims of sexual harassment in the workplace, we offer a multidisciplinary team uniquely suited to address these complex challenges.
One effective way to assist hurricane victims is for employers to give employees the option of donating leave that can be converted into cash charitable contributions. For practical tips on how to set up this type of program, please read Hurricane Recovery Client Alert: Establishing a Charitable Leave Donation Program.
A variety of tax-favored vehicles exist for employers and their employees to donate cash or even accrued leave to assist those impacted by Hurricane Harvey’s devastation. Our Hurricane Harvey Client Alert addresses four types of employer-sponsored relief programs that allow employers to provide assistance on a tax-advantaged basis.
As you have likely heard by now, the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has been targeting companies that require departing employees, as a condition to receiving severance benefits, to enter into severance agreements that discourage or prohibit the former employees from contacting regulators or from receiving whistleblower awards. The SEC whistleblower programs, established under Section 922 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and memorialized in Section 21F of the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and SEC Rule 21F-17, are designed to provide incentives to individuals to encourage their providing information regarding violations of securities laws, and to protect whistleblowers from retaliation resulting from any disclosure.
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has issued final regulations governing the operation of wellness benefits under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act . The final regulations, published today in the Federal Register and effective January 1, 2017, are largely unchanged from the proposed versions issued in 2015.