TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS
Washington may be the next state to enact its own data privacy law after a bill was introduced into the Washington State Senate earlier this month. Known as the Washington Privacy Act, the bill’s sponsor, Sen. Reuven Carlyle, stated at a press conference that lawmakers had reached “95 percent agreement in principle on the core elements of the bill.”
In a recent Wall Street Journal article, cybersecurity journalist Catherine Stupp drew attention to the massive surge in internet-connected devices expected to be in use by the end of 2020.

What Is Open Banking?

By Mike Pierides
// 18 December 2019 г.
Open Banking is an initiative mandated by the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) in 2017. It is intended to facilitate better competition in the banking sector by mandating protocols that facilitate the secure sharing of customer-related data of the nine largest banks in the United Kingdom (CMA9) with third-party providers (TPPs).
Please join us for a dynamic webinar on hot issues impacting the structuring and negotiation of ecommerce contracts in 2020.
For years, there has been a persistent trend toward outsourcing retirement plan recordkeeping and other administrative responsibilities. Although historically more prevalent for defined contribution plans, this outsourcing trend has been accelerating for defined benefit plans thanks, in part, to the prevalence of frozen plans (i.e., no more benefit accruals) and the potential for administrative cost savings.
The Clearing House (the oldest banking association and payments company in the United States) recently released a model agreement as a voluntary starting point to facilitate data sharing between financial institutions and fintech companies.
The EU Commission issued its report on the third annual review of the functioning of the EU-US Privacy Shield (Privacy Shield) on October 23.
A recent ruling by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) established that companies seeking to store “cookies” that are used to track online browsing behavior must obtain “active consent.” The ruling is likely to cause angst among companies, which often maintain websites that are not set up to obtain active consent, as well as with internet users who are increasingly frustrated by having to continually provide consent while visiting websites.
Morgan Lewis partners Ksenia Andreeva, Anastasia Dergacheva, Vasilisa Strizh, and Brian Zimbler and associate Anastasia Kiseleva contributed the chapter on Russia for the recently released Data Protection & Privacy 2020, the eighth edition of the Lexology Getting the Deal Through publication.
As our loyal Tech & Sourcing readers know, we have been doing our best to keep you informed about the requirements of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and what you can do to prepare as its January 1, 2020, effective date draws near. Continuing that vein, we invite you to an upcoming webinar wherein Morgan Lewis partners Reese Hirsch, Mark Krotoski, and Carla Oakley and associate Kristin Hadgis will provide an overview of the latest amendments to the CCPA, the state of the law and related regulations, and practical perspectives on CCPA compliance.