Legal Insights and Perspectives for the Healthcare Industry
The recent increase in use of telehealth as a care modality has been important to patients and providers alike, with significant benefits for public health. However, with the growing mainstream acceptance of virtual care, the US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG), the Department of Justice (DOJ), and other federal regulators have likewise increased fraud enforcement in this area, including through the issuance of OIG’s recent Special Fraud Alert (SFA).
The new Civil Cyber-Fraud Initiative of the US Department of Justice’s use of the punitive False Claims Act (FCA) and its whistleblower provisions has some important legal and risk management considerations for the health industry. Because enforcement will initially occur largely through civil investigations applying the FCA in the broadest possible way, healthcare organizations should undertake a priority assessment of their cybersecurity status to ensure that their practices can withstand hacks, whistleblowers, and government scrutiny.
The US Federal Trade Commission (FTC) recently voted to withdraw its approval of the Vertical Merger Guidelines (the 2020 VMGs), which, as we covered in the past, the FTC and Department of Justice (DOJ) issued over a year ago on June 30, 2020. The vote on September 15, 2021 to rescind the policy statement broke along party lines, with the three Democratic commissioners—Chair Lina Kahn and Commissioners Rohit Chopra and Rebecca Slaughter—outweighing their two Republican colleagues—Commissioners Noah Joshua Phillips and Christine S. Wilson.
On the heels of the US Department of Justice’s (DOJ’s) Criminal Division Fraud Section releasing its annual Year in Review, our white collar team published a LawFlash discussing the report, which highlights DOJ’s sustained aggressive enforcement efforts despite the COVID-19 pandemic.
The US Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General (OIG), the Department of Justice (DOJ), and other federal regulators have grown increasingly concerned about the use of telehealth technologies by perpetrators of various fraud schemes. While this is in part due to the meteoric rise in use of telehealth services during the past year and the need to quickly formalize permanent policy around the technology, the federal government’s concern extends well before the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE).
Insight from our antitrust team was recently featured in an article for the American Health Lawyers Association’s Journal of Health and Life Sciences Law.
On December 8, 2020, Judge Gerald Pappert in the US District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania denied a request from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Pennsylvania attorney general (AG) to preliminarily enjoin a proposed merger between Thomas Jefferson University (TJU) and Albert Einstein Healthcare Network (Einstein). The case was widely watched as the FTC sought to show that the combination of these two urban hospital systems would harm consumers.
We invite you to join us for a webinar series where we discuss our views on the enforcement priorities expected from the incoming Biden-Harris administration.
DOJ recently announced a massive coordinated effort with other federal agencies to charge 345 defendants allegedly responsible for over $6 billion in fraud. DOJ, OIG, FBI, DEA, and various US Attorneys’ Offices in 51 federal districts teamed up to unveil charges against more than 100 doctors, nurses, and licensed clinical personnel.
We invite you to join us on Tuesday, August 25 for our next installment of the Fast Break series, this time focused on fraud enforcement following the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.