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Legal Insights and Perspectives for the Healthcare Industry
Biometrics are physical or behavioral human characteristics that can be used to digitally identify a person to grant access to systems, devices, or data. Examples of biometric identifiers are fingerprints, facial geometry scans, and voice prints, as each are considered unique to the individual. Unlike a Social Security number, a person’s biometric data generally cannot be altered.
Ransomware attacks are increasing in their severity and sophistication, with healthcare companies being significant targets. Ransomware actors often target businesses believed to have fewer resources to invest in cyber protection, as well as those holding sensitive data, in the hopes that they will be more likely to make a quick ransom payment.
We invite Health Law Scan readers to join Morgan Lewis for the 11th Technology May-rathon, our annual series of tailored webinars focused on current technology issues, trends, and developments that are of key importance to our friends and clients.
Members of our labor and employment team recently published a LawFlash discussing the US Department of Labor’s (DOL’s) April 14 issuance of three pieces of subregulatory guidance addressing the cybersecurity practices of retirement plan sponsors, vendors, and plan participants respectively. This resource, which includes our team’s analysis and observations, may be of particular interest to employers in the healthcare sector, who are all too familiar with how important it is to keep data secure.
We invite Health Law Scan readers to join Morgan Lewis for an upcoming webinar series, Privatization of the Vaccine Rollout, which will explore the legal and regulatory issues for businesses that have become increasingly central to rolling out vaccines in the United States and around the globe.
Last month we had an incredibly insightful Fast Break analyzing a significant HIPAA enforcement victory for The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (MD Anderson) in the US Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. If you missed our live program with Morgan Lewis partner Scott McBride and MD Anderson Deputy Chief Compliance Officer Krista Barnes, you can still view the presentation, or check out the highlights below.
We hope you were able to join us for last month's Fast Break on the Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care, which has been a longstanding initiative of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and Office of the Inspector General to navigate a path to value-based payment models, culminating in the December 2020 final rules. If not, you missed a conversational session featuring Katie McDermott, Al Shay, and Jake Harper diving a bit deeper into this topic.
Partner Reece Hirsch recently attended and spoke at the 2020 Health Datapalooza held in Washington, DC.
New York’s Stop Hacks and Improve Electronic Data Security Act, or SHIELD Act, which makes significant changes to the state’s data breach notification requirements, impacts healthcare organizations that hold computerized data with private information from New York residents. In this LawFlash, our privacy and cybersecurity team analyzes the law’s expanded definition of “private information” and offers key business takeaways for assessing compliance with the SHIELD Act, which becomes effective October 23, 2019.
We discussed a bit about the background of how a startup begins and explored the process through which a successful startup begins to obtain capital, especially when integrating vertically with potential buyers of their products (not just their business).