Choose Site
TECHNOLOGY, OUTSOURCING, AND COMMERCIAL TRANSACTIONS
NEWS FOR LAWYERS AND SOURCING PROFESSIONALS

In response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, technology companies and public health authorities around the world have been developing contact tracing apps as a way to track and thus slow the spread of the virus. Implementation of those apps, however, can raise privacy and cybersecurity considerations.

Contact tracing apps essentially work by gathering information from individuals who have tested positive for the virus and then locating and notifying people with whom those individuals have been in close contact, frequently by use of GRP, Bluetooth, or wireless technology.

Please join us on September 8 for a webinar discussing the recently finalized California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) regulations. This webinar is part of our 2020 Data Privacy and Protection Boot Camp series.

The event will be led by Morgan Lewis partners W. Reese Hirsch and Andrew J. Gray IV. Discussion topics will include an overview of practical steps you can take to prepare for 2020 compliance with California’s landmark privacy law.

We previously discussed additional details regarding the CCPA and summarized the practical steps that companies can take to maintain compliance with the CCPA in this recent blog post and full Insight by our Morgan Lewis colleagues.

We hope you’ll join us on Thursday, September 8, 2020, from 12:00–1:30 pm ET (9:00–10:30 am PT).

Register for the webinar now >>

Please join us on September 9 for a webinar discussing cybersecurity enforcement issues. This webinar is part of our 2020 Data Privacy and Protection Boot Camp series.

Morgan Lewis partners Susan D. Resley and Andrew J. Gray IV will be the speakers at the event. Discussion topics will include spotting and mitigating enforcement issues concerning cybersecurity-related controls and disclosures.

We hope you’ll join us on Friday, September 9, 2020, from 12:00–1:30 pm ET (9:00–10:30 am PT).

Register for the webinar now >>

Following up on our CCPA post earlier this week, Morgan Lewis privacy lawyers Reece Hirsch and Andrew Gray have put together a webinar to discuss CCPA and how to prepare for 2020 compliance with California's landmark privacy law. Register for the webinar if you or your organization are curious about how the CCPA impacts your industry.

The California state attorney general issued a press release on August 14 stating that the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) has approved the California Department of Justice’s regulations regarding the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and filed them with the California secretary of state, making the regulations effective immediately.

The July 1 enforcement of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) is one week away. Despite calls by the business community and trade associations to push back the enforcement date to January 2021 due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and related disruptions to compliance efforts, the California state attorney general issued a press release on June 2 stating, “Businesses have had since January 1 to comply with the law, and we are committed to enforcing it starting July 1.”

Additionally, on June 1, the attorney general took action to finalize the CCPA regulations by submitting the final text of the proposed regulations to the California Office of Administrative Law, requesting expedited review in an attempt to have the regulations adopted and enforceable by July 1.

As businesses across America begin to reopen in the wake of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, many will likely implement new social distancing and sanitization procedures. That got us thinking about how companies may choose to use touchless authorization technologies like facial recognition as the main form of entry into their facilities, rather than continuing to use tools such as keypads or fingerprint scanners that require many people to repeatedly touch the same surfaces daily.

With more than 40 webinars total, the annual Morgan Lewis Technology May-rathon continues. We thought these particular webinars were especially timely with regard to topics we follow in Tech & Sourcing @ Morgan Lewis:

See the full schedule of remaining May-rathon events >>

Washington may be the next state to enact its own data privacy law after a bill was introduced into the Washington State Senate earlier this month. Known as the Washington Privacy Act, the bill’s sponsor, Sen. Reuven Carlyle, stated at a press conference that lawmakers had reached “95 percent agreement in principle on the core elements of the bill.” If enacted, the act would add to the complex regulatory framework governing data privacy, including the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which took effect on January 1, 2020.

The act would apply to legal entities conducting business or producing products targeted to Washington State residents and that (1) control or process personal data of more than 100,000 consumers or (2) derive 50% of gross revenue from the sale of personal data and process or control the personal data of more than 25,000 consumers.

The United States and the United Kingdom entered into the world’s first ever Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data Act (CLOUD Act) agreement on October 3, 2019 (the Agreement). The Agreement, which will enter into force later this year after review by lawmakers in both countries, allows each country’s law enforcement agencies to demand, with proper authorization, electronic data regarding serious crime (defined in Article 1 of the Agreement as an offense punishable by a maximum term of imprisonment of at least three years) directly from technology companies based in the other country.